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If you go door to door in our nation and talk to citizens about domestic violence, almost everyone will insist that they do not support male violence against women, that they believe it to be morally and ethically wrong. However, if you then explain that we can only end male violence against women by challenging patriarchy, and that means no longer accepting the notion that men should have more rights and privileges than women because of biological differences or that men should have the power to rule over women, that is when the agreement stops. There is a gap between the values they claim to hold and their willingness to do the work of connecting thought and action, theory and practice to realize these values and thus create a more just society.
All About Love: New Visions by bell hooks (via thechocolatebrigade)

realtakane:

marshmallowknight:

welp

[Top image is a pie graph titled “What We Mean When We Say “Disabled”“, with the two equal majority sections being “can’t do the thing” and “need assistance or accommodations to do the thing” with about a 6th of the chart being “doing the thing will cause us pain or stress”.

The bottom image is a pie graph titled “What Abled People Think We Mean By “Disabled”. It is monochrome and labelled “we’re lazy shits”.]

(Source: transyoite)

Most men never think about patriarchy—what it means, how it is created and sustained. Many men in our nation would not be able to spell the word or pronounce it correctly. The word “patriarchy” just is not a part of their normal everyday thought or speech. Men who have heard and know the word usually associate it with women’s liberation, with feminism, and therefore dismiss it as irrelevant to their own experiences. I have been standing at podiums talking about patriarchy for more than thirty years. It is a word I use daily, and men who hear me use it often ask me what I mean by it.

Nothing discounts the old antifeminist projection of men as all-powerful more than their basic ignorance of a major facet of the political system that shapes and informs male identity and sense of self from birth until death.

bell hooks, “Understanding Patriachy” (via heteroglossia)

lizzywhimsy:

megcubed:

The average age in Boston in the early 1770s was 14. More than half the population of Boston was under 21 in the events leading up to the American Revolution.

It really puts everything into a completely different context, doesn’t it?

 #England: YOU DO YOUR CHORES LIKE I ASKED YOU #America: YOU’RE NOT MY REAL MOM #*slams door* #England: OOOHH YOU’RE GONNA GET IT #America: EAT MY SHORTS (beggars-opera)

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